Research Publication Title

Separating Fact from Pseudoscience: A Look at the Efficacy of Six Health-Related Products

Major

Psychology

Faculty Mentor(s)

Christine Mutiti

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to evaluate various health-related products to determine whether the claims made in their advertisements are based on results obtained using sound scientific procedures such as controlled experiments. This would help to increase consumer awareness that not all products with scientific-sounding claims are reliable and that such products may fail to produce the effects claimed in the advertisments. Six products were examined including, weight loss products: Garcinia Cambogia and Hydroxycutª; skin care: Olay¨ Regenerist with Pentapeptides and sunscreens with a >50 SPF; hair growth: Minoxidil LLC; and memory improvement, Procera AVHª. The findings revealed that each product aforementioned exaggerated its efficacy in its advertisements, making claims that were not based on sound scientific procedures and research that was not peer-reviewed or statistically significant. Furthermore, many of these products were scrutinized as being unsafe for public consumption despite wide circulation in today's market. Four of the six products were not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including the following: Garcinia Cambogia, Hydroxycutª, Minoxidil LLC, and Procera AVHª. Sunscreen containing an SPF higher than 30 is no more protective against UV damage than those whose SPF is 30; in fact, studies show that people are at a greater risk of UV damage when using these higher-level sunscreens due to fewer applications of these types of suncreens. It was conclude that advertisements promoting health products that have not been evaluated and approved by the FDA regulation should be met with caution and skepticism. Seek the advice of a physician or other medical professional before purchasing such products, and carefully read the labels of each product to ascertain that it is safe to use.

Start Date

10-4-2015 12:15 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 1:00 PM

Location

HSB 3rd Floor Student Commons

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Apr 10th, 12:15 PM Apr 10th, 1:00 PM

Separating Fact from Pseudoscience: A Look at the Efficacy of Six Health-Related Products

HSB 3rd Floor Student Commons

The purpose of this research was to evaluate various health-related products to determine whether the claims made in their advertisements are based on results obtained using sound scientific procedures such as controlled experiments. This would help to increase consumer awareness that not all products with scientific-sounding claims are reliable and that such products may fail to produce the effects claimed in the advertisments. Six products were examined including, weight loss products: Garcinia Cambogia and Hydroxycutª; skin care: Olay¨ Regenerist with Pentapeptides and sunscreens with a >50 SPF; hair growth: Minoxidil LLC; and memory improvement, Procera AVHª. The findings revealed that each product aforementioned exaggerated its efficacy in its advertisements, making claims that were not based on sound scientific procedures and research that was not peer-reviewed or statistically significant. Furthermore, many of these products were scrutinized as being unsafe for public consumption despite wide circulation in today's market. Four of the six products were not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including the following: Garcinia Cambogia, Hydroxycutª, Minoxidil LLC, and Procera AVHª. Sunscreen containing an SPF higher than 30 is no more protective against UV damage than those whose SPF is 30; in fact, studies show that people are at a greater risk of UV damage when using these higher-level sunscreens due to fewer applications of these types of suncreens. It was conclude that advertisements promoting health products that have not been evaluated and approved by the FDA regulation should be met with caution and skepticism. Seek the advice of a physician or other medical professional before purchasing such products, and carefully read the labels of each product to ascertain that it is safe to use.