Event Title

A Comparative Analysis of the Sit-and-Reach Test and the R.S. Smith Sit and Reach Design

Major

Exercise Science

Faculty Mentor

Michael A. Martino

Abstract

The focus of this study is on the difference in the sit & reach flexibility assessment when performed in dorsiflexion (neutral) and in plantarflexion at 35 degrees from the neutral position. Similar studies have been done with the ankle in plantarflexion; however, it was not performed at a controlled fixed angle for standardized purposes. Previous studies have shown that while in plantarflexion, the lower body is under less tension than in dorsiflexion. It has also been shown that there is an average difference of 4.4 cm in men and 4.3 cm in women when comparing the two ankle positions. Current sit & reach assessment protocols only allow an individual to be assessed while in a dorsiflexed position, which is considered to be at 90 degrees. The problem is that the influence of the gastrocnemius on the entire superficial back line, which includes the hamstring and low back, is not taken into account. This study will serve to identify the level of influence the gastrocnemius has on the entire posterior chain. In addition to the preliminary 100 subjects, researchers will collect data from an extra 100 subjects.

Session Name:

Poster Presentation Session #2 - Poster #34

Start Date

10-4-2015 12:15 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 1:00 PM

Location

HSB 3rd Floor Student Commons

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Apr 10th, 12:15 PM Apr 10th, 1:00 PM

A Comparative Analysis of the Sit-and-Reach Test and the R.S. Smith Sit and Reach Design

HSB 3rd Floor Student Commons

The focus of this study is on the difference in the sit & reach flexibility assessment when performed in dorsiflexion (neutral) and in plantarflexion at 35 degrees from the neutral position. Similar studies have been done with the ankle in plantarflexion; however, it was not performed at a controlled fixed angle for standardized purposes. Previous studies have shown that while in plantarflexion, the lower body is under less tension than in dorsiflexion. It has also been shown that there is an average difference of 4.4 cm in men and 4.3 cm in women when comparing the two ankle positions. Current sit & reach assessment protocols only allow an individual to be assessed while in a dorsiflexed position, which is considered to be at 90 degrees. The problem is that the influence of the gastrocnemius on the entire superficial back line, which includes the hamstring and low back, is not taken into account. This study will serve to identify the level of influence the gastrocnemius has on the entire posterior chain. In addition to the preliminary 100 subjects, researchers will collect data from an extra 100 subjects.