Research Publication Title

Interpolating Correlations of Distribution Data for Neoporus Aulicus in the Southeastern United States

Major

Geography

Faculty Mentor(s)

George W. Wolfe

Abstract

Neoporus aulicus, a small water beetle, is one the most unusual members of the genus Neoporus, and it is important as an indicator of surface water conditions. This species is a member of the family Dytiscidae (predacious diving beetles) which are predominantly found in temporary woodland pools in southeastern temperate forests. The objective of this project is to determine if patterns of morphological variation among populations could help in part validate species status of these populations. In our analysis, distributional data was referenced to regional parameters of elevation, slope, soils, climate, and land cover in order to analyze geographical patterns of morphological variation. We found that N. aulicus predominantly occurred in temporary woodland pools associated with ultisol soils on the western side of the Appalachians, or in the fine-textured coastal zone sediment areas, which contained carbonate residual material and eolian sediment. Populations from the coastal plains exhibited more distinct punctations, especially within 100 miles of the coastline.

Start Date

10-4-2015 12:15 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 1:00 PM

Location

HSB 3rd Floor Student Commons

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Apr 10th, 12:15 PM Apr 10th, 1:00 PM

Interpolating Correlations of Distribution Data for Neoporus Aulicus in the Southeastern United States

HSB 3rd Floor Student Commons

Neoporus aulicus, a small water beetle, is one the most unusual members of the genus Neoporus, and it is important as an indicator of surface water conditions. This species is a member of the family Dytiscidae (predacious diving beetles) which are predominantly found in temporary woodland pools in southeastern temperate forests. The objective of this project is to determine if patterns of morphological variation among populations could help in part validate species status of these populations. In our analysis, distributional data was referenced to regional parameters of elevation, slope, soils, climate, and land cover in order to analyze geographical patterns of morphological variation. We found that N. aulicus predominantly occurred in temporary woodland pools associated with ultisol soils on the western side of the Appalachians, or in the fine-textured coastal zone sediment areas, which contained carbonate residual material and eolian sediment. Populations from the coastal plains exhibited more distinct punctations, especially within 100 miles of the coastline.