Event Title

Development of a novel approach for sampling burrowing crayfish utilizing environmental DNA in the crayfish burrows’ chimney structure

Presenter Information

Lauren Pace

Major

Biology

Faculty Mentor

Ellen Francy

Keywords

biology, crayfish, DNA

Abstract

Freshwater crayfish are important invertebrates that mediate detritus processing and nutrient cycling within freshwater habitats. We have been conducting molecular phylogeny research that examines the local extent and habitat boundaries of Cambarus truncatus, a rare species of burrowing crayfish in the Oconee River Basin, which is thought to be threatened. To analyze genetic structure of C. truncatus subpopulations, individual specimen must be collected for DNA extraction. The conventional sampling method requires extensive excavation down to their burrows, which is labor intensive and not conducive to large sample size. The goal of our project was to develop and validate a novel, eco-friendly way to collect DNA using the “chimney” soil produced by the crayfishes at their burrows based on preliminary data from a pilot study. At this time we have been unable to successfully isolate DNA from burrows using our methods but believe that focusing future studies on the collection of crayfish feces or soil exclusively from the inner mouth of the burrow could yield DNA for sampling.

Session Name:

Poster Presentation Session #2 - Poster #50

Start Date

10-4-2015 12:15 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 1:00 PM

Location

HSB 3rd Floor Student Commons

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 10th, 12:15 PM Apr 10th, 1:00 PM

Development of a novel approach for sampling burrowing crayfish utilizing environmental DNA in the crayfish burrows’ chimney structure

HSB 3rd Floor Student Commons

Freshwater crayfish are important invertebrates that mediate detritus processing and nutrient cycling within freshwater habitats. We have been conducting molecular phylogeny research that examines the local extent and habitat boundaries of Cambarus truncatus, a rare species of burrowing crayfish in the Oconee River Basin, which is thought to be threatened. To analyze genetic structure of C. truncatus subpopulations, individual specimen must be collected for DNA extraction. The conventional sampling method requires extensive excavation down to their burrows, which is labor intensive and not conducive to large sample size. The goal of our project was to develop and validate a novel, eco-friendly way to collect DNA using the “chimney” soil produced by the crayfishes at their burrows based on preliminary data from a pilot study. At this time we have been unable to successfully isolate DNA from burrows using our methods but believe that focusing future studies on the collection of crayfish feces or soil exclusively from the inner mouth of the burrow could yield DNA for sampling.