Research Publication Title

Perceived Stress Levels by College Students in Relation to Time in a Semester

Major

Psychology

Faculty Mentor(s)

Tsu-Min Chiang

Abstract

College is a unique period of time when students develop life long health habits and learn to cope with stress at all levels (Ying & Lindsey, 2013). Previous research has shown that college students have a higher level of daily stress approximately six months entering school, namely in their second semester (Lev Ari & Shulman, 2012). It may due to the accumulation of stress over the academic year (Rohan & Sigmon, 1997). However, limited research was found to address the type of students who may have the highest level of stress and at what time during the academic year. Therefore, the present study is designed to examine class status and gender differences in perceived stress level in the beginning and at the end of semester. Specifically, the last month in a semester and the 1st month of the semester were targeted in this research. We expect to find students who experience the most perceived stress within the fall semester of college would be freshman, whereas the highest amount of perceived stress during the spring semester would be seniors. There were 390 participants (male = 90, ages range from 18 to 34) responded to an online survey assessing subjective perceived stress. One-way ANOVAs revealed no significant differences were found in class standings. However, there was a gender difference at the end of the semester in stress level, but was not observed at the beginning of the semester. Details results and implications will be discussed at the conference.

Start Date

10-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

10-4-2015 10:00 AM

Location

HSB 304

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Perceived Stress Levels by College Students in Relation to Time in a Semester

HSB 304

College is a unique period of time when students develop life long health habits and learn to cope with stress at all levels (Ying & Lindsey, 2013). Previous research has shown that college students have a higher level of daily stress approximately six months entering school, namely in their second semester (Lev Ari & Shulman, 2012). It may due to the accumulation of stress over the academic year (Rohan & Sigmon, 1997). However, limited research was found to address the type of students who may have the highest level of stress and at what time during the academic year. Therefore, the present study is designed to examine class status and gender differences in perceived stress level in the beginning and at the end of semester. Specifically, the last month in a semester and the 1st month of the semester were targeted in this research. We expect to find students who experience the most perceived stress within the fall semester of college would be freshman, whereas the highest amount of perceived stress during the spring semester would be seniors. There were 390 participants (male = 90, ages range from 18 to 34) responded to an online survey assessing subjective perceived stress. One-way ANOVAs revealed no significant differences were found in class standings. However, there was a gender difference at the end of the semester in stress level, but was not observed at the beginning of the semester. Details results and implications will be discussed at the conference.