Event Title

Are There Common Characteristics Among Criminals?

Major

Criminal Justice

Faculty Mentor

Carrie L. Cook

Abstract

A fourteen-year-old high school basketball player presented with severe pain in mid thoracic spinal pain. After x-ray imaging, it was determined that the patient had a 14-degree curve, which was deemed mild scoliosis. Imaging was ordered every 6 months to monitor the progression of the curve. Over the next year the curve progressed to a 42-degree curve (severe scoliosis), and then eventually stopped at a 48-degree curve at age fifteen. Two years later the curve had progressed to a 58-degree curve and surgical measures were required. Post surgical complications led to a pulmonary embolism attached to the inferior boarder of the left rib cage. Prior to surgery, the doctor attempted to slow the curvature by using a Charleston Bending Brace. The brace was not as effective. Two years later the curve continued and surgery became necessary. The doctor used a spinal fusion technique to permanently stop the thoracic spine from moving. Two eighteen inch titanium rods, two medical wires, and sixteen screws were used to fuse T6-L3 of the patient’s spine. Hospitalization lasted six days, bed rest for three weeks, and no contact sports for six months. A pulmonary embolism developed one-week post hospital release, which required treatment in the intensive care unit of the hospital for an additional four days. The patient was then referred to a hematologist for ongoing care for the next six months. A blood thinner, Lovenox, was used to treat the pulmonary embolism for three months. The athletic trainer was instructed to work on core stability and progressive functional moving drills for basketball with the patient. No mandatory physical therapy was needed based on the type of surgery and the instrumentation put in place. Four years after the initial surgery the patient developed pain on the inferior boarder of the scapula. X-ray imaging showed the right titanium rod shifted slightly. Plyometric physical therapy was utilized and was successful, but over a six-month period the patient became sick with bronchitis and mononucleosis. The patient lost fifty pounds and developed pocketing edema in the lumbar region of the spine. Blood testing was done and the complete blood count (CBC) showed a level of 1800, well in the positive range for infection. Immediate surgery was done to remove the infection in the patient. In the doctor’s extensive experience of thousands of these type surgeries, this was the only patient to have the rods and screws removed this far past the operation due to an unknown source of contamination. After the 3 month regimen of antibiotics, the infection was completely cleared, and the patient made a full recovery.

Session Name:

Practicing Punishment: Confinement and other Concerns

Start Date

10-4-2015 10:15 AM

End Date

10-4-2015 11:15 AM

Location

HSB 201

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Apr 10th, 10:15 AM Apr 10th, 11:15 AM

Are There Common Characteristics Among Criminals?

HSB 201

A fourteen-year-old high school basketball player presented with severe pain in mid thoracic spinal pain. After x-ray imaging, it was determined that the patient had a 14-degree curve, which was deemed mild scoliosis. Imaging was ordered every 6 months to monitor the progression of the curve. Over the next year the curve progressed to a 42-degree curve (severe scoliosis), and then eventually stopped at a 48-degree curve at age fifteen. Two years later the curve had progressed to a 58-degree curve and surgical measures were required. Post surgical complications led to a pulmonary embolism attached to the inferior boarder of the left rib cage. Prior to surgery, the doctor attempted to slow the curvature by using a Charleston Bending Brace. The brace was not as effective. Two years later the curve continued and surgery became necessary. The doctor used a spinal fusion technique to permanently stop the thoracic spine from moving. Two eighteen inch titanium rods, two medical wires, and sixteen screws were used to fuse T6-L3 of the patient’s spine. Hospitalization lasted six days, bed rest for three weeks, and no contact sports for six months. A pulmonary embolism developed one-week post hospital release, which required treatment in the intensive care unit of the hospital for an additional four days. The patient was then referred to a hematologist for ongoing care for the next six months. A blood thinner, Lovenox, was used to treat the pulmonary embolism for three months. The athletic trainer was instructed to work on core stability and progressive functional moving drills for basketball with the patient. No mandatory physical therapy was needed based on the type of surgery and the instrumentation put in place. Four years after the initial surgery the patient developed pain on the inferior boarder of the scapula. X-ray imaging showed the right titanium rod shifted slightly. Plyometric physical therapy was utilized and was successful, but over a six-month period the patient became sick with bronchitis and mononucleosis. The patient lost fifty pounds and developed pocketing edema in the lumbar region of the spine. Blood testing was done and the complete blood count (CBC) showed a level of 1800, well in the positive range for infection. Immediate surgery was done to remove the infection in the patient. In the doctor’s extensive experience of thousands of these type surgeries, this was the only patient to have the rods and screws removed this far past the operation due to an unknown source of contamination. After the 3 month regimen of antibiotics, the infection was completely cleared, and the patient made a full recovery.