Event Title

Effect of Used Coffee Grounds on Kudzu Gug, Megacopta Cribraria, Herbivory*

Major

Biology

Faculty Mentor

Caralyn B. Zehnder

Keywords

coplac, biology, coffee

Abstract

Megacopta cribraria, also known as the kudzu bug, was first discovered in the southeastern United States in 2009. M. cribraria feed on soybeans (Glycine max), which causes a significant decrease in overall soybean yields. Currently, there is little to no information regarding environmentally safe control methods of this particular invasive species. Used coffee grounds have been implemented in many agricultural settings as a fertilizer and as a preventative of invasive pests. The purpose of these two greenhouse experiments is to determine whether the application of used coffee grounds has the potential to control or deter M. cribraria herbivory on soybeans. We hypothesize that UCG application will cause a decrease in M. cribraria herbivory on soybeans. The first experiment evaluated used coffee grounds (UCG) with six treatments of soil mixture measured by volume with 0% UCG (control), 2.5% UCG, 5% UCG, 10% UCG, 15% UCG, and 20% UCG. The second experiment evaluated used coffee grounds as a mulch applied to the soil surface with UCG weekly application, UCG daily application, and without UCG (control). M. cribraria preferences were recorded for both experiments and soil characteristics were also measured. This study will show whether used coffee grounds are effective at deterring M. cribraria herbivory on soybeans.

Session Name:

Biology II

Start Date

10-4-2015 10:15 AM

End Date

10-4-2015 11:15 AM

Location

HSB 207

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Apr 10th, 10:15 AM Apr 10th, 11:15 AM

Effect of Used Coffee Grounds on Kudzu Gug, Megacopta Cribraria, Herbivory*

HSB 207

Megacopta cribraria, also known as the kudzu bug, was first discovered in the southeastern United States in 2009. M. cribraria feed on soybeans (Glycine max), which causes a significant decrease in overall soybean yields. Currently, there is little to no information regarding environmentally safe control methods of this particular invasive species. Used coffee grounds have been implemented in many agricultural settings as a fertilizer and as a preventative of invasive pests. The purpose of these two greenhouse experiments is to determine whether the application of used coffee grounds has the potential to control or deter M. cribraria herbivory on soybeans. We hypothesize that UCG application will cause a decrease in M. cribraria herbivory on soybeans. The first experiment evaluated used coffee grounds (UCG) with six treatments of soil mixture measured by volume with 0% UCG (control), 2.5% UCG, 5% UCG, 10% UCG, 15% UCG, and 20% UCG. The second experiment evaluated used coffee grounds as a mulch applied to the soil surface with UCG weekly application, UCG daily application, and without UCG (control). M. cribraria preferences were recorded for both experiments and soil characteristics were also measured. This study will show whether used coffee grounds are effective at deterring M. cribraria herbivory on soybeans.