Research Publication Title

Harriet Jacobs' Use of Religious Icons in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Major

English

Faculty Mentor(s)

Katie Simon

Abstract

Slavery in the United States was a harsh reality of life for slaves, particularly in the Southern part of the country. From the founding of America, many Southern African American people were enslaved by white men until the Abolitionist Movement succeeded in helping to officially abolish slavery in 1865. The Abolitionist movement was active between 1830-1860; members were free African Americans who worked to free their enslaved brethren. One of the predominant figures of the Abolitionist Movement was Harriet Jacobs, author of the slave narrative, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Within her slave narrative, Jacobs uses Christian icons to create parallels between her characters and characters of the Bible, ultimately arguing that the slave race, like the Jewish people, is chosen by God and will be rewarded for its suffering.

Start Date

10-4-2015 1:15 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 2:15 PM

Location

HSB 209

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Apr 10th, 1:15 PM Apr 10th, 2:15 PM

Harriet Jacobs' Use of Religious Icons in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

HSB 209

Slavery in the United States was a harsh reality of life for slaves, particularly in the Southern part of the country. From the founding of America, many Southern African American people were enslaved by white men until the Abolitionist Movement succeeded in helping to officially abolish slavery in 1865. The Abolitionist movement was active between 1830-1860; members were free African Americans who worked to free their enslaved brethren. One of the predominant figures of the Abolitionist Movement was Harriet Jacobs, author of the slave narrative, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Within her slave narrative, Jacobs uses Christian icons to create parallels between her characters and characters of the Bible, ultimately arguing that the slave race, like the Jewish people, is chosen by God and will be rewarded for its suffering.