Research Publication Title

Early College Students as Organizational Border Crossers: Challenges to Meaningful Membership in the Wider Campus Community

Major

Middle Grades Education

Faculty Mentor(s)

Stephanie M. McClure

Abstract

This study analyzes interviews with 19 students in one Early College. Early Colleges (EC) are an educational form which builds the concept of dual enrollment into the structure of the school itself. They are often located on college campuses and most focus on enrolling middle and high school students who have been identified as Òat riskÓ and who would be first in their families to go to college. Thematic analysis of the interviews reveals student perceptions of the EC itself and the campus on which it is located. The structure of the relationship between the two organizations, combined with age, race, class, and geography differences between the EC students and their collegiate peers, significantly impacts their experience. The analysis requires consideration of previous research on campus racial climate, student social integration, and organizational power dynamics.

Start Date

10-4-2015 1:15 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 2:15 PM

Location

HSB 201

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Early College Students as Organizational Border Crossers: Challenges to Meaningful Membership in the Wider Campus Community

HSB 201

This study analyzes interviews with 19 students in one Early College. Early Colleges (EC) are an educational form which builds the concept of dual enrollment into the structure of the school itself. They are often located on college campuses and most focus on enrolling middle and high school students who have been identified as Òat riskÓ and who would be first in their families to go to college. Thematic analysis of the interviews reveals student perceptions of the EC itself and the campus on which it is located. The structure of the relationship between the two organizations, combined with age, race, class, and geography differences between the EC students and their collegiate peers, significantly impacts their experience. The analysis requires consideration of previous research on campus racial climate, student social integration, and organizational power dynamics.