Event Title

Social Media: Reconstructing the International System

Major

Political Science

Faculty Mentor

Jason Rich

Abstract

The international system is a constantly changing and developing area that requires constant study. It is influenced by the behavior of states, NGOs, and individuals within the states. The effect of individuals on the international system has been largely understudied, particularly with regards to the role of Social Media and the globalizing ability of Social Networking Sites. This paper examines the role of Social Media through both the Applied and Social perspectives of Constructivist Theory of international relations. My research finds that by expediting the norm life cycle and affecting both agent and structure at the same time, Social Media is a key factor in changing the norms that govern the international system and the states within it. The paper uses the Arab Spring as a case study to prove the transformative power that Social Media has over international norms as a result of its ability to globalize individual's perspectives and coordinate these views once they are held by a critical mass of individuals. Finally, the paper will prescribe three locations where, given the right conditions, it will be most likely that we will see the transformative power in action once again. These areas are Chechnya in Russia and China because of the level of internet penetration in these regions and the ability of individuals to use Social Media to communicate with others inside the state that share their views and the ability to communicate with others who live outside their state who have influential ability.

Session Name:

Graphic Internationalization: Reconstructing the Radical

Start Date

10-4-2015 1:15 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 2:15 PM

Location

HSB 211

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Apr 10th, 1:15 PM Apr 10th, 2:15 PM

Social Media: Reconstructing the International System

HSB 211

The international system is a constantly changing and developing area that requires constant study. It is influenced by the behavior of states, NGOs, and individuals within the states. The effect of individuals on the international system has been largely understudied, particularly with regards to the role of Social Media and the globalizing ability of Social Networking Sites. This paper examines the role of Social Media through both the Applied and Social perspectives of Constructivist Theory of international relations. My research finds that by expediting the norm life cycle and affecting both agent and structure at the same time, Social Media is a key factor in changing the norms that govern the international system and the states within it. The paper uses the Arab Spring as a case study to prove the transformative power that Social Media has over international norms as a result of its ability to globalize individual's perspectives and coordinate these views once they are held by a critical mass of individuals. Finally, the paper will prescribe three locations where, given the right conditions, it will be most likely that we will see the transformative power in action once again. These areas are Chechnya in Russia and China because of the level of internet penetration in these regions and the ability of individuals to use Social Media to communicate with others inside the state that share their views and the ability to communicate with others who live outside their state who have influential ability.