Research Publication Title

Assessment Of Water Quality On Oconee River And Fishing Creek Using Microalgae And Chemical Pollutants

Major

Environmental Science

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Kalina Manoylov

Keywords

Water Quality, Algae, Heavy Metals, Runoff, Surface Water

Abstract

All organisms require access to clean water. There has been a significant effort globally to assess quantities of nutrients, metals, pesticides, etc., which have been documented to increase due to human activities. Heavy metals are threatening to the biota in aquatic environments due to their bioaccumulation within trophic systems and long persistence in nature. Algal composition and abundance are useful water quality tools. Oconee River and its tributary, Fishing Creek, are aquatic environments used for recreation, and public water usage. Water quality was studied based on the correlation of the observed availability of heavy metal pollutants and the abundance of algal groups. Five sites along a three mile stretch of the Oconee River were analyzed above and below the inflow of Fishing creek and the creek itself. Nutrients, metals, and algal biomass were evaluated following standard protocol. Significantly higher conductivity (p

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Assessment Of Water Quality On Oconee River And Fishing Creek Using Microalgae And Chemical Pollutants

All organisms require access to clean water. There has been a significant effort globally to assess quantities of nutrients, metals, pesticides, etc., which have been documented to increase due to human activities. Heavy metals are threatening to the biota in aquatic environments due to their bioaccumulation within trophic systems and long persistence in nature. Algal composition and abundance are useful water quality tools. Oconee River and its tributary, Fishing Creek, are aquatic environments used for recreation, and public water usage. Water quality was studied based on the correlation of the observed availability of heavy metal pollutants and the abundance of algal groups. Five sites along a three mile stretch of the Oconee River were analyzed above and below the inflow of Fishing creek and the creek itself. Nutrients, metals, and algal biomass were evaluated following standard protocol. Significantly higher conductivity (p