Research Publication Title

Best Practice versus Present Practice in Preventing Pediatric Medication Errors

Major

Nursing

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Monica Ketchie

Keywords

medication, errors, pediatrics, nursing, safety

Abstract

Emily Hand and Bethany Flournoy Dr. Ketchie Undergraduate EBP Research- Abstract February 27, 2017

Medication errors in the general population is a safety hazard that can be decreased with proper education and careful administration procedures. In the pediatric healthcare setting, medication errors are especially hazardous due to the population’s ever-changing variation in age, weight, dosing ranges, and sensitivity towards medications. Although there is sufficient evidence of these miscalculations in the health care setting, hospitals and health-care facilities are frequently lacking adequate prevention and intervention techniques. The purpose of this project is to determine effective prevention strategies of medication errors in the pediatric population in comparison to the current modes of administration by reviewing published literature. Through database searches in CINAHL, PubMed, and Medline, approaches in reducing miscalculations in both intravenous and oral medication administration are reviewed for compatibility and effectiveness. Current practices denote the individualization of patient care; however, research shows that in collaboration with tailored care, standardization of methods of medication administration results in best practice.

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Best Practice versus Present Practice in Preventing Pediatric Medication Errors

Emily Hand and Bethany Flournoy Dr. Ketchie Undergraduate EBP Research- Abstract February 27, 2017

Medication errors in the general population is a safety hazard that can be decreased with proper education and careful administration procedures. In the pediatric healthcare setting, medication errors are especially hazardous due to the population’s ever-changing variation in age, weight, dosing ranges, and sensitivity towards medications. Although there is sufficient evidence of these miscalculations in the health care setting, hospitals and health-care facilities are frequently lacking adequate prevention and intervention techniques. The purpose of this project is to determine effective prevention strategies of medication errors in the pediatric population in comparison to the current modes of administration by reviewing published literature. Through database searches in CINAHL, PubMed, and Medline, approaches in reducing miscalculations in both intravenous and oral medication administration are reviewed for compatibility and effectiveness. Current practices denote the individualization of patient care; however, research shows that in collaboration with tailored care, standardization of methods of medication administration results in best practice.