Research Publication Title

Refinement of Production Grade Bio-diesel

Major

Physics and Chemistry

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Ken McGill

Keywords

Fuel, Renewable Energy, Green Chemistry, Biodiesel

Abstract

The modified Burton method for the thermal hydrogen-cracking of peanut oil has been investigated in McGill Research Group since 2009. The successful and reliable production of biodiesel has been achieved since 2014. A hydrocarbon with viscosity similar to Production Grade Diesel (PGD) will work in modern diesel engines. The starting material has a viscosity significantly higher than PGD. The pump has been updated and the rate at which the oil is pushed through the system has been altered. We have observed a product of slightly lower viscosity than PGD, as well as a significantly more viscous product. Determination of the hydroxyl value in this refined sample serves to investigate other instances of non-acidic oxidation, providing key structural and compositional information, which will inform modification of the synthesis in order to achieve lower acid values. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy was used for further qualitative analysis of the biodiesel product. A solar collector is being investigated as an alternative energy source by utilizing properties of UV radiation. The goal of research going forward is to make a less oxidized product with a viscosity close to PGD, consistently.

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Refinement of Production Grade Bio-diesel

The modified Burton method for the thermal hydrogen-cracking of peanut oil has been investigated in McGill Research Group since 2009. The successful and reliable production of biodiesel has been achieved since 2014. A hydrocarbon with viscosity similar to Production Grade Diesel (PGD) will work in modern diesel engines. The starting material has a viscosity significantly higher than PGD. The pump has been updated and the rate at which the oil is pushed through the system has been altered. We have observed a product of slightly lower viscosity than PGD, as well as a significantly more viscous product. Determination of the hydroxyl value in this refined sample serves to investigate other instances of non-acidic oxidation, providing key structural and compositional information, which will inform modification of the synthesis in order to achieve lower acid values. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy was used for further qualitative analysis of the biodiesel product. A solar collector is being investigated as an alternative energy source by utilizing properties of UV radiation. The goal of research going forward is to make a less oxidized product with a viscosity close to PGD, consistently.