Research Publication Title

Effects of College Employment and Financial Coping Strategies

Major

Psychology, Rhetoric

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Chiang

Keywords

Employment, Involvement, Age, Financial Coping Strategies

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of being employed while in college on a student’s campus involvement as well as relationship status, the effects of age on employment status in college students, and the perceived effects of finances on emotions and emotional coping strategies in college students. Research has shown that students who work 30+ hours tend to have less involvement in campus activities than those who are unemployed or who have shorter work weeks (Elling, Elling 2000). Research has also shown that daily financial issues and stressors are accompanied by an increase in negative social events and increased negative emotions (Sturgeon, Zautra & Okun, 2014). A total of 352 college students (83.5% Female, N=295) ages 18-23 were recruited through the web-based Experiment Management System, which is run through the GCSU Department of Psychological Science. Participants completed an online survey through this system. Both male and female participants are included to examine the gender effects as well.

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Effects of College Employment and Financial Coping Strategies

The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of being employed while in college on a student’s campus involvement as well as relationship status, the effects of age on employment status in college students, and the perceived effects of finances on emotions and emotional coping strategies in college students. Research has shown that students who work 30+ hours tend to have less involvement in campus activities than those who are unemployed or who have shorter work weeks (Elling, Elling 2000). Research has also shown that daily financial issues and stressors are accompanied by an increase in negative social events and increased negative emotions (Sturgeon, Zautra & Okun, 2014). A total of 352 college students (83.5% Female, N=295) ages 18-23 were recruited through the web-based Experiment Management System, which is run through the GCSU Department of Psychological Science. Participants completed an online survey through this system. Both male and female participants are included to examine the gender effects as well.