Research Publication Title

Plasma Characterization Using Optical Emission Spectroscopy

Major

Physics

Faculty Mentor(s)

Hasitha Mahabaduge

Keywords

Plasma, Sputtering, Optical Emission Spectroscopy

Abstract

Plasma Characterization Using Optical Emission Spectroscopy Abstract Magnetron sputtering is a widely-used technique for the deposition of thin films. During the sputtering process, a plasma is generated. Plasma is considered as the fourth fundamental state of matter. An ionized gas consisting of ionized particles and unbound free electrons make up the plasma. Using optical emission spectroscopy, characterization of the plasma was achieved. This is accomplished using an Ocean Optics HR 4000 high resolution spectrometer within the wavelength range of 200 nm to 1100 nm. As the ionized gas cools, photons experiencing a drop in their energy state by emitting a photon corresponding to a specific wavelength. We can measure this wavelength using the spectrometer, allowing the characterization of the plasma. The intensity ratio of Argon 750 nm and Argon 751 nm lines were further investigated to determine the effects of different deposition pressure and deposition power. Trends in the excitation temperature corresponding to the deposition power and deposition pressure will be discussed.

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Plasma Characterization Using Optical Emission Spectroscopy

Plasma Characterization Using Optical Emission Spectroscopy Abstract Magnetron sputtering is a widely-used technique for the deposition of thin films. During the sputtering process, a plasma is generated. Plasma is considered as the fourth fundamental state of matter. An ionized gas consisting of ionized particles and unbound free electrons make up the plasma. Using optical emission spectroscopy, characterization of the plasma was achieved. This is accomplished using an Ocean Optics HR 4000 high resolution spectrometer within the wavelength range of 200 nm to 1100 nm. As the ionized gas cools, photons experiencing a drop in their energy state by emitting a photon corresponding to a specific wavelength. We can measure this wavelength using the spectrometer, allowing the characterization of the plasma. The intensity ratio of Argon 750 nm and Argon 751 nm lines were further investigated to determine the effects of different deposition pressure and deposition power. Trends in the excitation temperature corresponding to the deposition power and deposition pressure will be discussed.