Proposal Title

Examining the Allelopathic Effects of Alligator Weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides, on the Whorled Marsh Pennywort, Hydrocotyle verticillata, and Algal Growth in a Hydroponic Bioassay

Primary Faculty Mentor’s Name

Christopher Beals

Session Format

Poster

Abstract

Non-native invasive species, such as Alternanthera philoxeroides, have been observed to outcompete indigenous species for limited resources. A. philoxeroides has expanded its distribution to much of the southeastern United States and has dominated much of the wetland ecosystems. Much of the success of A. philoxeroides is attributed to its ability to reproduce via vegetative propagation as well as its ability to completely cover aquatic surfaces. Limiting light penetration to the photic zone and overcrowding native species, A. philoxeroides has caused substantial changes to the environment they occupy. This investigation studied the allelopathic effects of A. philoxeroides on the native macrophyte whorled marsh pennywort, Hydrocotyle verticillata, as well as its effects on mixed algae. Morphometric parameters that included the weight and stem length of the H. verticillata were observed to assess the effects of A. philoxeroides exposure, and benchtop luminometer was used to perform oxidative stress enzyme analyses of H. verticillata. The luminometer was also used to quantify algal biomass changes as a result of A. philoxeroides exposure. A. philoxeroides has shown to have adverse effects on algal growth as well as inhibiting the growth of the native H. verticillata.

Keywords

invasive species, Alternanthera philoxeroide, wetland ecosystems, algae, marsh pennywort, Hydrocotyle verticillata

Presentation Year

2017

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

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Examining the Allelopathic Effects of Alligator Weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides, on the Whorled Marsh Pennywort, Hydrocotyle verticillata, and Algal Growth in a Hydroponic Bioassay

Non-native invasive species, such as Alternanthera philoxeroides, have been observed to outcompete indigenous species for limited resources. A. philoxeroides has expanded its distribution to much of the southeastern United States and has dominated much of the wetland ecosystems. Much of the success of A. philoxeroides is attributed to its ability to reproduce via vegetative propagation as well as its ability to completely cover aquatic surfaces. Limiting light penetration to the photic zone and overcrowding native species, A. philoxeroides has caused substantial changes to the environment they occupy. This investigation studied the allelopathic effects of A. philoxeroides on the native macrophyte whorled marsh pennywort, Hydrocotyle verticillata, as well as its effects on mixed algae. Morphometric parameters that included the weight and stem length of the H. verticillata were observed to assess the effects of A. philoxeroides exposure, and benchtop luminometer was used to perform oxidative stress enzyme analyses of H. verticillata. The luminometer was also used to quantify algal biomass changes as a result of A. philoxeroides exposure. A. philoxeroides has shown to have adverse effects on algal growth as well as inhibiting the growth of the native H. verticillata.