Research Publication Title

Incorporating Digital Imaging into the Scientific Process

Major

Biology

Faculty Mentor

Dr. David Weese

Keywords

Digital Imaging

Abstract

Defining and differentiating key organismal structures is not only important for taxonomic identification, but can also aid students in making connections between anatomical features and their respective physiological functions. Due to advancements in digital technology, high resolution images can be utilized as a tool in research for describing and identifying taxonomic structures as well in the classroom for developing guides to assist student learning. Given this, high-resolution images were taken from multiple disciplines utilizing the state-of-the-art Visionary Digital BK Plus imaging system to demonstrate the potential ability of successfully incorporating digital imaging into the classroom, research and even the publication process. First, in order to demonstrate the system's capabilities, images of a butterfly were taken at 65mm, 100mm, 5X, and 10X magnifications. Second, images of a crayfish leg were taken to demonstrate how the system's finite measuring capacities can be utilized in describing and illustrating taxonomically important structures. These images were then converted to digital illustrations using a drawing tablet and Adobe illustrator, which potentially could be used to develop taxonomic keys for species identification or even teaching purposes. Lastly, to demonstrate how high-resolution images can potentially be incorporated into the classroom, multiple images of a flower dissection were taken. In these images, key external and internal structures of the flower were identified and labeled such as the stigma, stamen and ovary. Although these dissection images cannot supply the tactile experiences of live dissections, they can be used to develop guides to assist student learning during dissections. Taken together, we hope these examples demonstrate how high-resolution images taken with the department’s imaging system can be incorporated in both teaching and research.

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Incorporating Digital Imaging into the Scientific Process

Defining and differentiating key organismal structures is not only important for taxonomic identification, but can also aid students in making connections between anatomical features and their respective physiological functions. Due to advancements in digital technology, high resolution images can be utilized as a tool in research for describing and identifying taxonomic structures as well in the classroom for developing guides to assist student learning. Given this, high-resolution images were taken from multiple disciplines utilizing the state-of-the-art Visionary Digital BK Plus imaging system to demonstrate the potential ability of successfully incorporating digital imaging into the classroom, research and even the publication process. First, in order to demonstrate the system's capabilities, images of a butterfly were taken at 65mm, 100mm, 5X, and 10X magnifications. Second, images of a crayfish leg were taken to demonstrate how the system's finite measuring capacities can be utilized in describing and illustrating taxonomically important structures. These images were then converted to digital illustrations using a drawing tablet and Adobe illustrator, which potentially could be used to develop taxonomic keys for species identification or even teaching purposes. Lastly, to demonstrate how high-resolution images can potentially be incorporated into the classroom, multiple images of a flower dissection were taken. In these images, key external and internal structures of the flower were identified and labeled such as the stigma, stamen and ovary. Although these dissection images cannot supply the tactile experiences of live dissections, they can be used to develop guides to assist student learning during dissections. Taken together, we hope these examples demonstrate how high-resolution images taken with the department’s imaging system can be incorporated in both teaching and research.