Research Publication Title

Aggression in American Versus Taiwanese Children

Major

Psychology

Faculty Mentor

Tsu-Ming Chiang

Keywords

Aggression, Developmental Psychology, Cross-Cultural, Taiwan

Abstract

Past literature examining aggression of children shows that the type of culture the child grows up in effects parental attributions and children’s aggressive tendencies. In the Turkish collectivistic culture, children were found to be more confused by directions and less supported by their parents, creating problems in other areas of their lives (Yaman, Mesman, IJzendoorn, Bakermans-Kranenburg, & Linting, 2010). Although a common hypothesis as why children might be more aggressive in Western countries is the increased use of “violent media” in Western countries compared to Asian countries, results have not supported the claim (Krahé et al., 2016). In a study that was performed in Russia, results show that aggressive tendencies in classrooms is mostly shaped by how the teacher’s implement self-regulation development. Racial tolerance and restraint in risk situations were the specific variables that impacted the students greatly (Banshchikova, Fomina, & Morosanova, 2018). In addition, Chinese boys’ aggressive behaviors were related to the parental disciplinary strategies and physical aggression towards these children (Li, Putallaz, & Su, 2011). Preliminary results from studying the levels of physical aggression in young American children showed that children in a Head start program seemed to display less aggression than children who were not in a Head Start program. It was opposite of what was previously hypothesized. With an opportunity to study abroad, the researchers examined the differences of aggressive behaviors between the American and Taiwanese children. Furthermore, parenting styles were documented for this cross-cultural study. The data will be compared to the on-going research on levels of physical aggression in American children, to examine the relationships of parenting styles and children’s aggressive behaviors. The Taiwanese children are hypothesized to be less aggressive than the American children overall.

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Aggression in American Versus Taiwanese Children

Past literature examining aggression of children shows that the type of culture the child grows up in effects parental attributions and children’s aggressive tendencies. In the Turkish collectivistic culture, children were found to be more confused by directions and less supported by their parents, creating problems in other areas of their lives (Yaman, Mesman, IJzendoorn, Bakermans-Kranenburg, & Linting, 2010). Although a common hypothesis as why children might be more aggressive in Western countries is the increased use of “violent media” in Western countries compared to Asian countries, results have not supported the claim (Krahé et al., 2016). In a study that was performed in Russia, results show that aggressive tendencies in classrooms is mostly shaped by how the teacher’s implement self-regulation development. Racial tolerance and restraint in risk situations were the specific variables that impacted the students greatly (Banshchikova, Fomina, & Morosanova, 2018). In addition, Chinese boys’ aggressive behaviors were related to the parental disciplinary strategies and physical aggression towards these children (Li, Putallaz, & Su, 2011). Preliminary results from studying the levels of physical aggression in young American children showed that children in a Head start program seemed to display less aggression than children who were not in a Head Start program. It was opposite of what was previously hypothesized. With an opportunity to study abroad, the researchers examined the differences of aggressive behaviors between the American and Taiwanese children. Furthermore, parenting styles were documented for this cross-cultural study. The data will be compared to the on-going research on levels of physical aggression in American children, to examine the relationships of parenting styles and children’s aggressive behaviors. The Taiwanese children are hypothesized to be less aggressive than the American children overall.