Research Publication Title

A Driving Versus Walking Roadkill Survey on Highway 212 in Baldwin County, Georgia

Presenter Information

Kori OgletreeFollow

Major

Biology

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Al Mead

Keywords

roadkill, walking survey, driving survey, wildlife mortality, persistence

Abstract

Due to wildlife mortality along roadways, wildlife managers need an efficient and effective way of surveying and identifying locations that may be considered roadkill hotspots. Hotspots are influenced by habitat differences, temporal variables, weather, as well as road topography and features. I used two survey methods, driving and walking, to monitor a short section (1.16 km) of Highway 212 in Baldwin County, Georgia for one year. I mapped the location of all roadkilled vertebrates and monitored roadkill persistence and from sunup to noon. The study area was surveyed every Tuesday and Thursday of every week when weather was appropriate. My next steps include analyzing data in respect to a previous study to show the efficiency of driving versus walking surveys. With proper survey techniques and understanding of hotspot influences, wildlife managers can implement the best mitigation techniques to decrease wildlife road mortality.

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A Driving Versus Walking Roadkill Survey on Highway 212 in Baldwin County, Georgia

Due to wildlife mortality along roadways, wildlife managers need an efficient and effective way of surveying and identifying locations that may be considered roadkill hotspots. Hotspots are influenced by habitat differences, temporal variables, weather, as well as road topography and features. I used two survey methods, driving and walking, to monitor a short section (1.16 km) of Highway 212 in Baldwin County, Georgia for one year. I mapped the location of all roadkilled vertebrates and monitored roadkill persistence and from sunup to noon. The study area was surveyed every Tuesday and Thursday of every week when weather was appropriate. My next steps include analyzing data in respect to a previous study to show the efficiency of driving versus walking surveys. With proper survey techniques and understanding of hotspot influences, wildlife managers can implement the best mitigation techniques to decrease wildlife road mortality.