Research Publication Title

Gender Socialization Mediated By SES and Birth Order

Major

Psychology

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Tsu-Ming Chiang

Keywords

Psychology, Gender Socialization, Socioeconomic Status, Birth Order

Abstract

Women have made considerable gains in recent years concerning equality in social settings and the workplace; yet, the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) remain skewed (Diekman, Brown, Johnston, & Clark, 2010). This trend, along with the emergence of M. Gilbert’s (2009) Non-Binary Genderism, urges researchers to identify the source of the gender norms that enforce inequality, such as the view that men should suppress emotions or women should avoid STEM fields (Levant, 1992). Tenenbaum & Leaper’s (2003) study found that parents believed boys performed better and were more interested in STEM fields than girls, though the actual performance and interest levels were equal between genders. The Role Congruity Theory (Diekman & Goodfriend, 2006), states that a group will feel successful and accepted once they fulfill their given social roles. This theory helps offer a clear explanation for the continuance of gender norms--parental gender socialization. Secondary data was collected through Social Competence Behavior Evaluation forms after they were filled out by the parents of the 3 to 5 year old children from the Early Learning Center. Sulloway’s (2001) Family-Niche Model of Personality demonstrated that the order in which a child is born, relative to his or her siblings, can have drastic effects on the level to which the child adopts the parents’ belief system. Research indicates that first-born children tend to follow the views of their parents, while second-borns often rebel, creating their own unique ideologies. Additionally, studies on socioeconomic status (SES) and its’ effects on cognitive development have shown that financial hardship has a significant effect on the socialization of young children (Mistry, Biesanz, Chien, Howes, & Benner, 2008). Results showed parents indicated their child’s favorite toy is consistent with the sex of the child, more findings will be shared at conference.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Gender Socialization Mediated By SES and Birth Order

Women have made considerable gains in recent years concerning equality in social settings and the workplace; yet, the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) remain skewed (Diekman, Brown, Johnston, & Clark, 2010). This trend, along with the emergence of M. Gilbert’s (2009) Non-Binary Genderism, urges researchers to identify the source of the gender norms that enforce inequality, such as the view that men should suppress emotions or women should avoid STEM fields (Levant, 1992). Tenenbaum & Leaper’s (2003) study found that parents believed boys performed better and were more interested in STEM fields than girls, though the actual performance and interest levels were equal between genders. The Role Congruity Theory (Diekman & Goodfriend, 2006), states that a group will feel successful and accepted once they fulfill their given social roles. This theory helps offer a clear explanation for the continuance of gender norms--parental gender socialization. Secondary data was collected through Social Competence Behavior Evaluation forms after they were filled out by the parents of the 3 to 5 year old children from the Early Learning Center. Sulloway’s (2001) Family-Niche Model of Personality demonstrated that the order in which a child is born, relative to his or her siblings, can have drastic effects on the level to which the child adopts the parents’ belief system. Research indicates that first-born children tend to follow the views of their parents, while second-borns often rebel, creating their own unique ideologies. Additionally, studies on socioeconomic status (SES) and its’ effects on cognitive development have shown that financial hardship has a significant effect on the socialization of young children (Mistry, Biesanz, Chien, Howes, & Benner, 2008). Results showed parents indicated their child’s favorite toy is consistent with the sex of the child, more findings will be shared at conference.