Research Publication Title

Comparison of Front and Side-Facing Jumps to Assess Maximal Vertical Jump Height using the Vertec

Presenter Information

Oliver CarnazzoFollow

Major

Exercise Science

Faculty Mentor

Mike Martino

Keywords

vertical jump, Vertec, vertical jump height

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare front and side-facing jumping techniques in determining vertical jump height using the Vertec vertical jump measuring device. The Vertec unit is a very popular device utilized for assessing maximal jump height. Previous research has shown strong correlations between increased vertical jump height and sport specific running speed. Field tests make vertical jump testing feasible without expensive laboratory equipment such as force plates or camera systems. Using a randomized crossover design, 41 participants, including athletes (n=19) and non-athletes (n=22), performed three to five countermovement jumps from both a front-facing (FF) and side-facing (SF) position. The highest jump from each individual’s trials was used for analysis. A paired samples t-test revealed that the FF jumps were significantly higher for non-athletes (mean±SD; FF 18.3±5.0in.; SF 17.4±4.8in.; p

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Comparison of Front and Side-Facing Jumps to Assess Maximal Vertical Jump Height using the Vertec

The purpose of this study was to compare front and side-facing jumping techniques in determining vertical jump height using the Vertec vertical jump measuring device. The Vertec unit is a very popular device utilized for assessing maximal jump height. Previous research has shown strong correlations between increased vertical jump height and sport specific running speed. Field tests make vertical jump testing feasible without expensive laboratory equipment such as force plates or camera systems. Using a randomized crossover design, 41 participants, including athletes (n=19) and non-athletes (n=22), performed three to five countermovement jumps from both a front-facing (FF) and side-facing (SF) position. The highest jump from each individual’s trials was used for analysis. A paired samples t-test revealed that the FF jumps were significantly higher for non-athletes (mean±SD; FF 18.3±5.0in.; SF 17.4±4.8in.; p

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