Presenter Information

Rachel MillerFollow

Major

Nursing

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Gail Godwin

Keywords

nutrition, depression, the gut-brain connection, nutritional psychiatry

Abstract

Recent research studies have revealed that there is validity to the claim that “you are what you eat”. In fact, emerging science suggests that there is evidence supporting that eating a nutrient dense healthy diet impacts one’s mental health. The goal of this research is to explore how the foods we consume affect our emotions. More specifically this poster focuses on the gut-brain connection and how individuals with depression are impacted by their food choices. To investigate the link between nutrition and depression, a literature review of three prominent research articles was completed. The articles examined include A modified Mediterranean dietary intervention for adults with major depression: Dietary protocol and feasibility data from the SMILES trial, Healthy dietary indices and risk of depressive outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies, and Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression. Evaluation of each of these studies reveal that proper nutrition can improve symptoms in individuals diagnosed with depression.

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The Gut Brain Connection: Does our diet affect our mood?

Recent research studies have revealed that there is validity to the claim that “you are what you eat”. In fact, emerging science suggests that there is evidence supporting that eating a nutrient dense healthy diet impacts one’s mental health. The goal of this research is to explore how the foods we consume affect our emotions. More specifically this poster focuses on the gut-brain connection and how individuals with depression are impacted by their food choices. To investigate the link between nutrition and depression, a literature review of three prominent research articles was completed. The articles examined include A modified Mediterranean dietary intervention for adults with major depression: Dietary protocol and feasibility data from the SMILES trial, Healthy dietary indices and risk of depressive outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies, and Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression. Evaluation of each of these studies reveal that proper nutrition can improve symptoms in individuals diagnosed with depression.

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