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Major

Psychology

Faculty Mentor

Tsu-Ming Chiang

Keywords

Parenting, Misbehavior, Children, Discipline

Abstract

The way parents perceive behaviors in children as to whether they are harmful would influence how they choose to deal with that behavior. When employing ineffective disciplinary styles consistently throughout children’s development, behavioral issues may continue to arise. Researchers oftentimes study how parenting discipline styles affect a child’s behavior. However, researchers often fail to study how parental perception of children’s behaviors concerning parenting disciplinary styles. In terms of behaviors, the frequency of children’s positive and negative behaviors may be related to how parents choose to regulate the child. For example, if the child demonstrates a higher frequency of misbehavior, it is likely that the parent would use forceful strategies. On the other hand, if the child demonstrates compliant behaviors, the parent would more likely uses a mild form of regulation. In a study carried out by Snyder, Cramer, Afrank, and Patterson (2005), researchers stated that when parents carried out effective discipline techniques that entailed a “nonhostile attribution style” then they were more sympathetic towards changes in their child’s behavior. In contrast, children who display disobedient and noncompliant behavior are often disciplined ineffectively along with hostile parenting styles. Thompson et al. (2017) carried out a study which demonstrated similar findings – physical discipline from parental figures was related to more aggression and inappropriate behaviors in children. In the present study, we examined the frequency of children’s behaviors and its relationship to parental disciplinary strategies from more than 87 parents of age three and four years old from multiple cohorts collected in preschools. Additional factors such as social economic status (SES) are examined as well. We expect the higher frequencies of misbehavior are correlated with ineffective, hostile disciplinary styles. The SES is also expected to be associated with different parental styles. Results and findings will be shared at the conference.

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The Relationship Between Children’s Misbehavior and Parental Discipline

The way parents perceive behaviors in children as to whether they are harmful would influence how they choose to deal with that behavior. When employing ineffective disciplinary styles consistently throughout children’s development, behavioral issues may continue to arise. Researchers oftentimes study how parenting discipline styles affect a child’s behavior. However, researchers often fail to study how parental perception of children’s behaviors concerning parenting disciplinary styles. In terms of behaviors, the frequency of children’s positive and negative behaviors may be related to how parents choose to regulate the child. For example, if the child demonstrates a higher frequency of misbehavior, it is likely that the parent would use forceful strategies. On the other hand, if the child demonstrates compliant behaviors, the parent would more likely uses a mild form of regulation. In a study carried out by Snyder, Cramer, Afrank, and Patterson (2005), researchers stated that when parents carried out effective discipline techniques that entailed a “nonhostile attribution style” then they were more sympathetic towards changes in their child’s behavior. In contrast, children who display disobedient and noncompliant behavior are often disciplined ineffectively along with hostile parenting styles. Thompson et al. (2017) carried out a study which demonstrated similar findings – physical discipline from parental figures was related to more aggression and inappropriate behaviors in children. In the present study, we examined the frequency of children’s behaviors and its relationship to parental disciplinary strategies from more than 87 parents of age three and four years old from multiple cohorts collected in preschools. Additional factors such as social economic status (SES) are examined as well. We expect the higher frequencies of misbehavior are correlated with ineffective, hostile disciplinary styles. The SES is also expected to be associated with different parental styles. Results and findings will be shared at the conference.

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