Research Publication Title

Patterns Of Millipede Community Structure Across Habitat Types

Presenter Information

Amarah ShakurFollow

Major

Biology

Faculty Mentor

Bruce Snyder

Keywords

millipede, bycatch, xeric, mesic, habitat, ecosystem, Spirobolida, Polydesmida, Julida

Abstract

Diplopoda, a diverse class of arthropods, is composed of millipede species that are pertinent to soil health. Millipede diversity is more understudied in comparison to many other invertebrates in the terrestrial environments of southeastern North America. As an integral part of ecosystem functionality, millipede species vary depending upon habitat composition. The current study focused on the millipede bycatch from a previous study conducted at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, just southeast of Augusta; this study focused on the linyphiid spiders. We identified millipedes from preserved millipede specimens from eight pitfall sites traversing contrasting habitats, ranging from xeric to mesic habitats and various dominant overstory species. Millipedes were collected in 10 pitfall traps at each site. Traps were run continuously, over the course of a year, while being emptied every two weeks. Results of the study exhibit Polydesmida were dominant in mesic habitats with longleaf pine, whereas Julida were dominant in drier conditions, particularly the xeric sandhill upland sites. Julida abundance prevailed during this study making up just under 60% of the total collected sample population.

GCSU 2020 Conference Final Poster AYS0417 Posted.pdf (484 kB)
Poster Presentation-Patterns of Millipede Community Structure Across Habitat Types

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Patterns Of Millipede Community Structure Across Habitat Types

Diplopoda, a diverse class of arthropods, is composed of millipede species that are pertinent to soil health. Millipede diversity is more understudied in comparison to many other invertebrates in the terrestrial environments of southeastern North America. As an integral part of ecosystem functionality, millipede species vary depending upon habitat composition. The current study focused on the millipede bycatch from a previous study conducted at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, just southeast of Augusta; this study focused on the linyphiid spiders. We identified millipedes from preserved millipede specimens from eight pitfall sites traversing contrasting habitats, ranging from xeric to mesic habitats and various dominant overstory species. Millipedes were collected in 10 pitfall traps at each site. Traps were run continuously, over the course of a year, while being emptied every two weeks. Results of the study exhibit Polydesmida were dominant in mesic habitats with longleaf pine, whereas Julida were dominant in drier conditions, particularly the xeric sandhill upland sites. Julida abundance prevailed during this study making up just under 60% of the total collected sample population.

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