Presenter Information

Bentley EarnestFollow

Major

Political Science

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Steve Elliott-Gower

Keywords

In-class Simulations, High Impact Practices, Role-Playing, National Security Council (NSC)

Abstract

GC Student Research Conference Abstract: NSC Role-Playing Simulations: Student Perspectives Statement of Purpose: This will be an oral presentation accompanied by a powerpoint. The purpose of this project is to examine how Kuh and O’Donnell’s (2013) Eight “Key Elements' of High Impact Practices influence simulation based courses. Research Context: We are examining how applying Kuh and O’Donnell’s (2013) Eight “Key Elements” of High-Impact Practices to four National Security Council simulations conducted in Spring 2019 impacted student perspective, as well as assessing (from both faculty and student perspectives) how successful the simulations were in terms of these key elements. Our presentation will demonstrate the power of role-playing simulations in creating engaging and well rounded classroom settings. Performance Expectations Significant Investment of Time and Effort Interactions with Faculty and Peers Experiences with Diversity Frequent, Timely, Constructive Feedback Opportunities to Reflect and Integrate Learning Learning through Real-World Application Public Demonstration of Competence Methodology: To conduct this research, Dr. Gower and I sought IRB approval to send an anonymous data collection survey to all students within Dr. Gower’s GC1Y Spring 2019 course. This survey asked the students to rank, on an ordinal scale, how effective each of the eight key elements were represented within his course. Thus far, this survey has collected ~5/16 responses. Conclusion: This research is still in progress as it is our intention to resend the survey following spring break. We would like to collect 50%+ responses from the students in the course to better understand the majority of student perspectives. Currently, the extent of our responses range from “Agree” to “Strongly Agree”. We have yet to receive any negative feedback from students who have taken the survey.

Included in

Education Commons

Share

COinS
 

NSC Role-Playing Simulations: Student Perspectives

GC Student Research Conference Abstract: NSC Role-Playing Simulations: Student Perspectives Statement of Purpose: This will be an oral presentation accompanied by a powerpoint. The purpose of this project is to examine how Kuh and O’Donnell’s (2013) Eight “Key Elements' of High Impact Practices influence simulation based courses. Research Context: We are examining how applying Kuh and O’Donnell’s (2013) Eight “Key Elements” of High-Impact Practices to four National Security Council simulations conducted in Spring 2019 impacted student perspective, as well as assessing (from both faculty and student perspectives) how successful the simulations were in terms of these key elements. Our presentation will demonstrate the power of role-playing simulations in creating engaging and well rounded classroom settings. Performance Expectations Significant Investment of Time and Effort Interactions with Faculty and Peers Experiences with Diversity Frequent, Timely, Constructive Feedback Opportunities to Reflect and Integrate Learning Learning through Real-World Application Public Demonstration of Competence Methodology: To conduct this research, Dr. Gower and I sought IRB approval to send an anonymous data collection survey to all students within Dr. Gower’s GC1Y Spring 2019 course. This survey asked the students to rank, on an ordinal scale, how effective each of the eight key elements were represented within his course. Thus far, this survey has collected ~5/16 responses. Conclusion: This research is still in progress as it is our intention to resend the survey following spring break. We would like to collect 50%+ responses from the students in the course to better understand the majority of student perspectives. Currently, the extent of our responses range from “Agree” to “Strongly Agree”. We have yet to receive any negative feedback from students who have taken the survey.

blog comments powered by Disqus